Posts Tagged: tea

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tea-lan:

The tea tumbler is currently my favorite way to brew tea. I’ve fallen completely in love with this method, and only in a couple of days.

One: Less tea in somewhat cooler water (1 tsp to about 10-11oz of water) still brews up as strong as the usual Western method. And you save on tea, and with great tea you can keep re-steeping. I steeped @verdantea’s Laoshan Black Chocolate Genmaicha for about 30oz before I got tired, but the tea was still tasty at the end of it.

Two: There’s a lot of water in a tumbler, so there’s less fuss with refills or awkward teapots. It reduced by more than half my trips to re-steep my tea, resulting in more time to enjoy tea, even while working or, as the case may be, enjoying some RPG time with friends.

Three: Gone are the days of wondering how much tea and how hot the water should be. Gone also are the now unnecessary tea timers. Now there is only tea. Much tea.

Four: Cleanup is easy and earth-friendly. Dump the leaves out of a smooth-walled container. I pour the leaves and rinse out the tumbler in the sink, and then use the disposal unit to tear up the leaves so there is no clogging.

Five: I chose a non-BPA plastic tumbler, which resulted in a metal mesh strainer that was far easier to deal with than the metal pop-ins of the glass tumblers. Less fuss, more happy, no plastic aftertaste of any sort.

Six: Works with black tea, oolongs, white tea, most green teas. I have not tried rooibos because that tends to be too fine for most metal strainers. Herbals/tisanes might work, but I haven’t tried those (again, fine particulates that go right through most metal mesh). Works best with unbroken leaf, naturally. I don’t see gyokuro working quiite with this method, not without a significantly low temperature (100F maybe?).

Seven: Pretty with the right tea. Oh my, it transforms tieguanyin into leafy art.

I really love my tumbler. Buying another for work, and, well, aieee, it’s so easy.

Source: tea-lan
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tea-lan:

That’s tumbler, not tumblr, although this could be considered an experiment with that too. 

So I recently got a tea tumbler from Amazon.com, made by Teas Etc. 

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Most people in the West seem to think that tea tumblers need to have strainers so you can lift out the steeping tea before it goes all bitter. But the secret of the tea tumbler is to use (a) less leaves, and (b) cooler water. The tumbler works particularly well with green teas (Dragonwell seems to be popular here), especially ones you can get multiple steeps out of. 

The Tea Traveler from Teas Etc. comes with instructions on the box, and is made of non-BPA thick-walled plastic, with leak-proof strainer and lid. The strainer is useful if you’re drinking poorer quality teas with more broken leaf, which is pretty much most flavored teas and blends (except for the teas from places such as Verdant Tea, which use unbroken leaf for their blends). Because it’s easy to use the strainer and there are instructions, I highly recommend this tumbler for first-time users. 

One interesting thing about the tumbler is that it does show you which teas are high quality and which are not. In particular, the more broken leaf there is, the less pretty the tea is when it blooms in the water. Conversely, the better the leaf, the prettier the view. 

Using less tea makes your tea last longer, and you still can get multiple steeps out of it. Using cooler water means you can drink your tea sooner. A tea tumbler is a pretty nice investment that way. 

Over the next few days I’ll be experimenting with my tea tumbler to see if it can really do blacks and oolongs justice. Green teas work very well at 170F with 1 level tsp of leaf. White teas seem to do well at similar temperatures (180F is recommended). 

It would be hilarious if this became my preferred method of drinking tea, because I have five teapots and a new gaiwan set. 

First post in my tea-and-stuff side blog! Naturally it doesn’t explain the pun, but oh well. ^_^

Source: tea-lan
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For tea, board games, and perhaps my Vietnamese heritage exploration, see my new sideblog tea-lan, which is a pun on kỳ lân. 

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Every time I think a tea site won’t annoy me they start going on about how the antioxidents will magically make the cancer go away and I just want them to stop.

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auntymana:

eleneripenneth:

hunterraiehorror:

miss-gelly:

failwolfhale:

Any kind. Hot. Cold. White. Green. Black. Rooibos. Herbal. Oolong. Sweet. Unsweet. With Milk. Without. Tea is great.

All tea

Tea is life.

Tea is life. 

The Tea must flow!

(via moniquill)

Source: failwolfhale
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Answer
  • Question: Do you like Teavana? - Anonymous
  • Answer:

    uglyorangecouch:

    asgardreid:

    samanticshift:

    underunderstood:

    samanticshift:

    Never tried it. Should I?

    I gotta jump in here and say my piece on Teavana. It’s going to be a long post.

    1) Overpriced tea, poor quality — though usually better than supermarket brands, since loose leaf is inherently better than bagged 99% of the time. (One notable exception: Lady Gray, which is strangely less tasty in loose leaf form, imo.) Broken leaves everywhere due to the way they showcase the tea to people, ramming metal spoons into the storage containers. They quite often leave tea leaves out on display in the light and air, which ruins their flavour. That said, their blends are almost always fantastic, and their top-price teas are at least of decent quality (you can find better for the same price, imo).

    2) Pseudoscience and misleading information up the wazoo. They will not hesitate to tell you that x tea will help prevent or cure y, or strongly imply that it will. Whether that’s because employees believe that from their training or just want to sell, I’m not sure. For example, I was told that a maté tea was an excellent tea for people sensitive to caffeine, because it had the effects of caffeine without the actual caffeine in it. Absolutely not true, and that information can harm other people (e.g., my best friend is prone to panic attacks after caffeine consumption).

    3) There are pages upon pages of alleged former employees talking about Teavana’s crooked selling tactics. They are taught to always upsell, pressuring even those new to tea to buy just about anything regardless if they even need it (a $150 tea set for some peppermint tea? No thanks). They sell from the top up, no matter what — I’ve directly pointed to a cheaper tea and asked for it, only to spend 10 minutes dinking around as the employee tries to sell me a near-identical, yet 3x more expensive tea. Then the 2x more expensive tea. Then the 1.5x expensive tea… ad infinitum. They routinely overfill the bag when it’s on the scale, knowing that if they politely ask “Oh, I went over how much you wanted, is that okay?” the customer will usually say yes. A 0.2 oz overfill doesn’t seem like much until you realize that some of their teas are $27+ for 2oz. (A $5 overcharge). The company allegedly pushes all employees to do these sorts of things. I’m inclined to believe it because it happened to me all the time. 

    4) Employees are required to sell x amount of tea per week, which seems reasonable until you realize that it’s a very small population that actually buys tea in bulk, and tea is only beginning to get popular in North America. This perpetuates the up-selling and lying to sell more. It’s also incredibly stressful, according to many employees. They appear to have a very high turnover rate of employees, at least from what I see at my local Teavana.

    5) They totally lie to you about the amount of tea you need to make a decent cuppa. They tell you 1-2 tsp per 8oz, which is the standard for most loose leaf teas. But if you watch carefully when you order one from the store (and they always taste delicious), they put 1-2 TABLESPOONS. I can only attribute this to the poor quality of the teas. Also, they sweeten their sample teas to hell and back and won’t hesitate to do so to a drink you order to go — did I mention that ordering a drink is a pain in the butt because they’d much rather sell you the loose leaf tea? 

    6) I’ve heard rumours about them using additives, artificial colours, preservatives, and so on… I think they’ve changed since they merged with Starbucks, though.

    7) Frankly, for an equal or slightly higher price point you can order amazing teas online, not deal with pushy retail assistants, and (in some cases) support the tea farmers directly, since many have their own online storefronts.

    (P.S. Teavana’s Earl Gray Creme is decent. It’s got less of a bite to it than traditional earl grays, though.)

    This is super educational and awesome, holy shit.

    Order from Adagio instead.

    ^Even better, find a local independent tea store.

    There are at least two in my area, one of which I buy almost all my loose leaf from. Obviously every local store is different, but you’ll usually get higher quality tea for about the same prices, if not less, than a chain like Teavana or David’s Tea. (I’ve never actually been to a David’s Tea, but I’ve gotten a lot of their teas as gifts and I have to say I’m not super impressed. They tend to go for label and scent appeal without bothering to check if the tea actually tastes good.)

    They’ll also usually do special orders, offer discounts for bulk if you need a lot (when I made my wedding favours I got 2.5 kg of tea for $57 per kg, and that blend was normally $9 for 100 g, I think), and sometimes even offer custom blends.

    I’ve never found a loose leaf tea store that doesn’t overemphasize unproven and quite frankly ridiculous-sounding health benefits, chain or independent, so I’m not sure how to get around that one other than do your own research and stay skeptical.

Source: samanticshift
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georgetakei:

Your Wednesday earworm. I’m such a teas. http://ift.tt/1mY32Ax

[image: the Bigelow tea flavor “Sweet Dreams” with a post-it below it that says “are made of teas”. The entire image is captioned, “brew am I to disgree?”]

georgetakei:

Your Wednesday earworm. I’m such a teas. http://ift.tt/1mY32Ax

[image: the Bigelow tea flavor “Sweet Dreams” with a post-it below it that says “are made of teas”. The entire image is captioned, “brew am I to disgree?”]

Source: georgetakei
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Available on Amazon.com.

Pros:  
- IT’S A TARDIS 
- Doesn’t drip 
- IT’S A TARDIS

Cons:
- Holds only 3 cups of tea. SMALL cups of tea.
- Uses decals not paint so hand wash only
Really… it had me at “disappoint” when it wasn’t bigger on the inside. :(
Available on Amazon.com.

Pros:
- IT’S A TARDIS
- Doesn’t drip
- IT’S A TARDIS

Cons:
- Holds only 3 cups of tea. SMALL cups of tea.
- Uses decals not paint so hand wash only

Really… it had me at “disappoint” when it wasn’t bigger on the inside. :(

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vmites:

….tea rexes. Hahaha? Get it? Tea. Ha. I’m going to sleep.

(via moelskerdeg)

Source: vmites
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http://pica-scribit.tumblr.com/post/81660210120/alchemypotato-replied-to-your-post-ive-decided-to

lifeislikeabadrpg:

pica-scribit:

Very exciting. Relevant to my interests. The green tea is not faring well so far (I admit I have limited interest in green tea.)

So I went to the Fortnum and Mason website, and it insists that the

Do you have pictures of the tea? It’s easy to ID most green teas. Their leaves are larger than most black teas.

Also when you brew green teas you get a light liquid. If yours is light and not dark red that’s another green tea indicator.

Source: pica-scribit
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http://pica-scribit.tumblr.com/post/81660210120/alchemypotato-replied-to-your-post-ive-decided-to

pica-scribit:

Very exciting. Relevant to my interests. The green tea is not faring well so far (I admit I have limited interest in green tea.)

So I went to the Fortnum and Mason website, and it insists that the

Do you have pictures of the tea? It’s easy to ID most green teas. Their leaves are larger than most black teas.

Source: pica-scribit